Friday, June 26, 2015

Are your families logical or emotional consumers?

Karen Darby-Ritz,
Advance Planning Manager,
Camino del Sol Funeral
Chapel & Cremation Center
Do you remember why you bought your last car? Was it because of the pretty color? Or was it something more logical? If you ask someone why they bought their car, they will more than likely explain their logical reasoning such as the gas mileage, the safety rating and the affordability.

The same goes for funerals. If you ask someone why they chose your funeral home, they will likely say the convenient location, the affordable prices and the service options. Are these the only motivators?

More times than not, consumers think they are making decisions based on research and facts alone. But actually, there are many other unconscious factors in play such as:
  • What others are using or doing
  • Personal biases
  • Fear of losing out on a product
  • Personal drive
It’s not that they’re lying about their choice, it’s because they want to believe the logical reasons that back up their decisions. We all have a need to be able to defend our actions to ourselves and to others.

You might buy a cherry red sedan because it subconsciously reminds you of the cool convertible you had as a teenager, but you’ll likely buy it because of the safety rating.

So, to best present our funeral home’s products and services, we need to paint the full picture for them. Whether it’s a price shopper on the phone or a family deciding between urn vaults, it’s not enough to tell them what we think they want to know. We have to reach them on both an emotional level and a logical level. Sure, you can explain tensile strength or warranty details, but you also need to talk about peace of mind. When you can reach a family on both levels, you are proving to them you have real value.


This article originally appeared in Trigard Tuesdays, our weekly electronic newsletter featuring information for the funeral industry. Sign up for your free subscription at http://www.trigard.com/tuesdays.

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

What's outside your backdoor?

Blake Swinford,
Project Manager
At Trigard, we value education. Whether you learn from schools, webinars, seminars or conventions, it is important for all of us to stay educated about the latest ideas.

While driving home from an extrusion seminar at Pennsylvania College of Technology in Williamsport, Pennsylvania last week, I began thinking about the upcoming national conventions Trigard is attending. Going to these conventions and networking with funeral professionals on a national level is very valuable, and we always leave with great ideas to implement at our own facilities. But, do you have to go to the biggest convention to get the best ideas?

Do you frequently attend state conventions? You don’t always have to have a booth, but I can’t emphasize enough the importance of exploring the educational and professional opportunities that are available to you at the state level. Learning what is going on across the country is very beneficial, but seeing what others are doing in your own back yard can be even more important.

It's a great time for you to start making plans to attend upcoming conventions. Explore those happening close to home and those across the country. And, if you're a Trigard dealer, be sure to join us at Trigard Convention, August 12 – 14, 2015 in Indianapolis.


This article originally appeared in Trigard Tuesdays, our weekly electronic newsletter featuring information for the funeral industry. Sign up for your free subscription at http://www.trigard.com/tuesdays.

Friday, June 12, 2015

Why do you do it?

Brodie Krause,
IT Manager
I used to work in a corporate environment. My tasks were largely the same as they are now, but the whole environment was shaped around strengthening the company’s bottom line. We were in the widget business. Selling widgets for the biggest profit, with the least amount of overhead, was what it was all about. When things got tough, I would often ask myself, “Why am I doing this?” and I would really have to strain for an answer.

Fast-forward a few years. I recently received a message from a friend whose family had been served by our funeral home. They thanked me generously for the care and support their family received from our staff. This is why I love what I do and where I do it. I’m the IT guy. I wasn’t directly involved in any of the preparations for this family, but because I’m part of this team, I get to work each day towards the goal of satisfying and comforting families. My work supports those who in turn support grieving families.

When you get caught in the whirlwind of your day-to-day business, do you find yourself wondering why you’re doing it? Do you sometimes find your motivation lost in the minutia of taking orders, digging holes or pouring concrete? Last week, our Creative Director, Julia Sullivan shared a common story about a family’s horrible experience regarding the burial of their loved one. Think about those families who, in their grief, are placing their trust in your team to make sure their loved one is interred respectfully.

My friend thanked me because their family felt loved and respected as they went through the initial grief and memorialization process. I want to take a moment to extend that gratitude to you, as members of the greater Trigard team of dealers.  My friend’s family thanks you, as do all the other families whose trust falls in your hands each day.


This article originally appeared in Trigard Tuesdays, our weekly electronic newsletter featuring information for the funeral industry. Sign up for your free subscription at http://www.trigard.com/tuesdays.

Friday, June 5, 2015

Teach families the difference

Julia Sullivan,
Creative Director
I recently heard about a cemetery that was sued when a woman discovered that her loved one had been buried in an outer burial container with holes in the bottom. Even without being there, you and I know that it was most likely a concrete box (described as a “grave liner”), and she might have even been told that it was required by the cemetery. But that’s likely where the conversation ended.

I don’t know the details of the conversations that were had, but I know that the family is upset, the cemetery is stressed and the media is involved. All of it could have been prevented with a one-minute conversation.

I think about the number of families across the country who have chosen a concrete box instead of a lined, sealed burial vault. I realize it can be because of financial reasons, which I respect and can sympathize with. But how many families end up with a concrete box with holes in the bottom because they didn't understand the difference?

Make sure this never happens to a family you serve.

This article originally appeared in Trigard Tuesdays, our weekly electronic newsletter featuring information for the funeral industry. Sign up for your free subscription at http://www.trigard.com/tuesdays.